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General Angling Topics => Shore Angling => Topic started by: REEFMAN on November 08, 2011, 02:56:05 PM

Title: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on November 08, 2011, 02:56:05 PM
(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/read%20the%20water.jpg)

In order to increase your chances of catching fish, an angler needs to be able to "read the water".
Studying and understanding the prevailing conditions will enable you to put your bait or lure in the right place at the right time.

Sea conditions on our coastline vary greatly, so what is written here is designed as a basic guide, to try improve our understanding of what's going on beneath the water and why. Hopefully, it might help improve your skill and chances of catching fish.

Water Clarity and Temperature

Water clarity and Temperature affects our fishing noticeably.
Crystal clear (Gin) water is generally an indication of difficult fishing conditions.

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/Gin%20water.jpg)
 
Generally, cold water is crystal clear.
Due to prevailing winds, warmer surface water is pushed out to sea, to be replaced by nutrient rich colder water from the depths. (More on this later.) This colder water is normally crystal clear to start with, but being nutrient rich and filled with planktonic microorganisms, after a day or 2 of being warmed by the sun and photosynthesis taking place, these organisms will often form a plankton bloom, which then gives the water that characteristic 'greenish/brown tinge' to it. This is often called 'water with colour' in fishing terms, and is highly sought after, because schools of bait fish will move in and readily feed on these blooms. These bait fish will be followed by Predators.

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/water%20with%20colour.jpg)

Ginger beer water - Kob country!



WIND DIRECTION

How does this cold clear water move inshore?

The phenomenon is known as Eckman transport
Ekman transport, part of Ekman motion theory first investigated in 1902 by Vagn Walfrid Ekman (for whom it is named), is the term given for the 90 degree net transport of the surface layer of a liquid (depth to which wind penetrates), due to wind forcings. The direction of transport is dependent on the hemisphere. In the northern hemisphere this transport is at a 90 degree angle to the right of the direction of the wind, and in the southern hemisphere it occurs at a 90 degree angle to the left of the direction of the wind.

Basically what this means is that in the Southern Hemisphere, water will travel 90deg to the LEFT of a prevailing wind.

In KZN, the North East wind blows down the coast parallel to the shore. What this then does is push the Warm Surface water out to sea. The deeper colder water from deep sea then comes in and replaces it....

(https://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/research/divisions/fe/estuarine/oeip/figures/Figure_CU-01.JPG)

This is the reason that fishing picks up after 2 days of a North East wind in KZN. The cold water upwelling brings nutrients with it, which after a day or 2 of photosynthesis, causes plankton blooms, which give the water 'colour'.

Similar principles can be applied in Cape waters... where the prevailing winds will cause surface water to move to the left.


Oxygen Content of the water

On the opposite side of the spectrum... in KZN, a South-Westerly offshore wind keeps the water warm, depleting the water of nutrients and also causing the Oxygen content to drop. This makes the water clear again, and being depleted of Oxygen, causes fish to become sluggish. The warmer the water, the less Oxygenated it becomes.

Remember that these are generalizations - what most often happens with the prevailing winds. Note that there are always exceptions to these 'rules' because so many other factors play an influencing role... eg. Barometer pressure, Wind strength etc.

An example is that after a North East wind for a few days, the cold water has had a chance to bloom nutrients, optimal for feeding. Then the front switches around and the South Wester will blow warm water back inshore. This is optimal fishing time - slightly warmer water with nutrients available. A steady SW wind for a few days causes the nutrients to become depleted, oxygen content to drop and fishing then becomes poor.

Another example - Warm water with a steady wind over it, creates a choppy sea, which oxygenates the water - the environment suddenly becomes a lot more conducive to fishing because of the induced oxygen in the water and more cover for prey and predators alike. Predatory fish also have a lot more difficulty hunting in crystal clear, flat, calm conditions. At times like this, they will definitely become a lot more active at night than in the day.

It would stand to reason that if the water is calm, clean and with little movement, the places that do have some movement or some white water would be the better option.

Conversely if the sea is rough, there is lots of white water and generally fairly low visibility  conditions, the quieter water becomes the better option.


BAROMETER

Atmospheric pressure is a good prediction of weather patterns.
Low pressure indicates stormy weather and the fish will go off the bite.
High pressure indicates fair weather and stable conditions... more chance of fish feeding during these conditions.
More importantly, is the very beginning of a dropping barometer - Fish will feed before an approaching storm or between the approaching fronts, or as the barometer rises and falls through the course of the day.
On a rising barometer (after a storm) the fish will feed better too. In my experience, it's when a Barometer starts to move that's important.

These are very basic, general guidelines, as there are always exceptions to the rule, but generally speaking...

 ■ Rising Barometer: Fishing is Best

■Rapidly Fluctuating: Indication of good fishing (regardless of fluctuating up or down).

■Static Barometer: Fishing is poor

■Falling Barometer: First part of fall is good fishing. After the fall continues for several hours, the more the it goes down the poorer fishing will be.

■Unusually Low Barometer: Don’t bother as there is no fishing, because there will be a big storm!





Surface action of the water.


SWELL
Far  out to sea, winds blowing across vast sections of flat water cause the  surface water to produce a 'wind wave' - a wave of water that varies in  size according to the strength of the wind. These 'wind waves' continue  to flow, even when the wind that caused them has stopped, when they  become known as 'swells'. These swells continue to move until their  energy dissipates.

Notice how a water molecule (red dot in the  animation below), doesn't move dramatically forward as one would think  when a wave passes. Rather it moves in an Orbital path, slowly moving  forward with every cycle.

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/Swell.gif)

[Interestingly,  Short waves, lose their energy much quicker than long waves, which is  why swells from distant storms are only long waves. (waves with periods  larger than 13 secs). These long swells lose half of their energy over a  distance that varies from over 20000 km (half the distance round the  globe) to just over 2000 km! ]

When they are large enough, these  long swells will reach the shoreline, with varying results. Once formed,  there is very little that a 'local' wind (near the shore) can do to  affect these swells, besides creating 'white horses' that appear on the  crests of swells and making for a choppy sea.

WAVES

Once  these swells reach shallower water, or an obstruction beneath them (eg  sandbank, reef, pinnacle) they change in a number of ways.

As a  swell approaches the coastline and comes into contact with the sea floor  the waves will start to slow down. The shallower the water becomes the  slower they move. As they slow down they have to squash together. (i.e.  they shorten their wave period.) This process results in increasing wave  height. The steeper the sea floor gradient the more pronounced the wave  height will increase. The increase in wave height begins to occur at  depths of around one half of the wavelength.

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/wave%20height%20increase.jpg)


As  the wave moves into increasingly shallow water, the bottom of the wave  decreases speed. There comes a point where the top of the wave overtakes  it and starts to spill forward — the wave starts to break.  In general a wave will start to break when it reaches a water depth of 1.3 times the wave height.

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/Shallowwater%20wave%20break.jpg)




Slope of Sea Floor

If you've read everything we have written up to this point, you know that it's the action of the sea bed slowing the bottom part of the wave that causes the wave to break.

Gradual slope: A gently sloping approach causes the bottom of the wave to drag and will result in the top of the wave prematurely overtaking the bottom resulting in the wave breaking in deeper water. These crumbling waves won't be steep and will lack punch.

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/gradual%20slope.jpg)

Wave breaking on a Steep sloping sea floor: - a steep slope or a reef. The swell approaches the Sandbank/reef at a greater speed, since it hasn't been slowed down by any slope yet. From the diagram below it can be seen that the wave "jacks up" due to the rapid change in depth creating a higher wave. The breaking depth is reached much later than on the gently sloped bottom. The top of the wave quickly overtakes the bottom and pitches forward. The waves created by the rapid change in depth are much steeper and hollower ---> the wave tube is born!
Rapid depth change creates steep pitching waves - those big thunderer backline waves so prevalent on the KZN North Coast. Behind those waves is much deeper water!

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/STEEP%20SLOPE.jpg)


What determines the slope of the Seabed?

It's quite important to understand how different slopes are formed.
Generally, the Southern parts of South Africa has fine sand, which is much more resistant to Wave action than coarser sand, which is found in the Northern parts of our Coastline. Coarser sand is more prone to being moved (due to the friction co-efficient). Fine sandy beaches (Cape) generally makes for flatter gentler slopes into the sea. The further North one goes, the more prevalent coarse-grained beaches become and the deeper the drop-offs and the faster the slope on the beaches.

BEACHES

Beaches are made up of a series of troughs, channels and sand banks.
From the Intertidal zone (where the water washes up the beach) one would normally find a drop-off or lip, forming a trough that runs parallel to the beach.
Beyond the trough is a Sandbank that separates the trough from the Open sea. Somewhere along the trough, which can run for many km's, there is an opening or channel that runs straight out to sea.

Troughs are notoriously poor at producing fish. Because the water in these troughs is usually clear - this is not a good spot for Bait fish to hide! Bait fish will always look for turbulent water, that provides bubbles and colour in which they can hide. These areas are right next to Sandbanks, where the water run-off causes turbulence, sediment in the water, good feeding characteristics for bait fish schools.
Predators prey on Baitfish using the element of surprise. They cannot hide themselves in clear water/troughs. Predators will lurk and patrol on the edges of structure like sandbanks, where they know the baitfish will be.
So although the deep water troughs on a beach look so inviting, there are very rarely any fish in them, because there is no cover!

The spots to put your bait in - always look for "working water", the water running off a sandbank or structure that creates white water or "foamies". The bubbles and sediment in the water provide excellent cover for the little ones, with the Predators utilizing this cover in smash and grab runs.


(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/TROUGH.jpg)

The sand bank at the back of the trough is broken by these channels leading out and if it is a fine-grained beach that is gently sloping, there may be a series of two or three such troughs and sand banks going seaward.
On a coarse-grained beach (KZN) one very seldom finds more than one trough and one bank at the back. The water tends to be deeper in these troughs than on fine grained beaches.

Looking from above....

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/TROUGH2.jpg)

The open sea channels are an excellent place to put your bait out. On either side of the opening between 2 sandbanks is prime territiory - the bait fish will be there feeding on the sediment, and the scent of your bait will call fish from beyond the opening out to sea.

To summarize... a swell approaching a gradual sandbank will have a soft crumbling wave. A swell approaching a steep sandbank will have a big dumper type wave. So we now have a good idea of the depth of the water behind the Sandbank.

Once a wave has passed over the bank, watch carefully - it will reveal to you the slope characteristics on the inside of the bank down into the trough!

A steep slope going into the trough will give you a very distinct cut-off between the white water of the wave and the blue calmer water... (the Kob drop-off!  :hnthnt: ). This cut-off line is often a couple of metres shoreward of the drop-off, in other words, if your bait lands exactly on the line it is going to be a few metres into the deep water rather than on the bank.
To land on the bank, one has to try to anticipate how strong the water is and how far it is pushing the white water shore-ward and place your cast a few metres into the white.


(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/deep%20trough.jpg)

The bigger the area is that the white water fades into the blue, the gentler the gradient (no clear cut-off). One will notice here that the bigger the swirl or the foamy that comes off the bank, the further it will extend white water shoreward and generally one can assume that the fish will be spread over a bigger area on the inside of the bank.


(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/gradual%20trough.jpg)

What to look out for

Courtesy of Barry Wareham

The more water that comes in over the bank in the form of breaking and rolling waves, the more the water piles up in the inside channel and the stronger the current will be running out to sea in the holes on the side of the bank. It is very important to remember this, particularly when fishing for smelling type fish as it is this current going seaward that will bring big fish into the hole to look for the bait. Look for the seaward rips, as this is the best chance you are going to get to pull big fish on smell. The opening in between 2 sandbanks is the ideal spot to put a Slide bait or a big cast bait out.

Fish feeding activity on beaches definitely increases when the tide starts to push (Incoming tide). Quite often, once fish have fed successfully, they will move offshore or move to a resting or holding area where they will bide their time until it is time to go and search for a meal once more and again, this would generally coincide with an incoming tide if on a beach.

Look for the deep drop-offs, particularly where there is a bit of a swirling action in the water. Look for banks that are showing some soapy water with the odd breaking wave, rather than water that is rolling all the time. Fish like to feed on these types of banks and the takes are often quite dramatic. I mentioned above the holding or resting areas, because on many occasions anglers successfully catch fish that are not feeding aggressively and not eating the baits, particularly size wise, that they normally would. Just like any animal, once they have fed, they are not inclined to take big bait, but will often just suck up a tit-bit. When Kob are not feeding in the churn on the back of a bank or on the shoreward dropoff, they can sometimes be found chilling in a hole and will be tempted with a much smaller well-presented bait.

Isolated banks are brilliant, particularly if the water all around them is deep. There will often be an abundance of fish on the edges if the bank is still too shallow, but they will feed aggressively on the bank as soon as it is deep enough. The big predators too will be found patrolling the deep water around the bank. These isolated banks are easily identified by the calm water all around them, but waves lifting, breaking, rolling and then fading into a swell, show one exactly where the bank is.

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/isol%20sandbank.jpg)

When you see sand lifting or churning, remember that all kinds of food items are probably being exposed and fish hang around these areas. On the beaches that have very fine sand, most fish are very tolerant of this fine sand and can often be caught in it. On coarse-grained beaches however, the fish definitely avoid being in the churning sand, but will definitely hunt around the edges.

RIPS AND SIDEWASH

Side currents and the effects of Longshore drift cause a sidewash. Generally if there is a very strong side-wash on the beach continually in the same direction the whole length of the beach, it is not a very good condition to fish in, as it is difficult to get a sinker to hold. If there is absolutely no current, it is also not very conducive to good angling, but at least one can still fish in it.

It is very important to be able to identify an outgoing current, sometimes referred to as a 'Rip’. This normally intensifies on an outgoing tide, but can be quite obvious and intense when seas are big.

The vast majority of fish that we target use their sense of smell extensively. Current gets them homing in on your bait. Whenever you stand and watch the water it is imperative that you work out which way the current is going and how strong it is.

Rips that go straight out to sea can pull fish from a long way off. Remembering that wind will blow anything floating on the surface, one should always try to look for things in the water, bits of weed, etc., that will give you an indication as to which way and how fast the water is moving.  Having established this, you can throw your bait to the area that is going to make maximum use of the current. Should there already be other baits in the water, you obviously need to position yours where it is the first one the fish will come across when he comes homing in on the smell!


(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/rip.jpg)

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/rip2.jpg)
 
Generally when one looks down the length of a sandy beach, there are long curves with fairly distinct points on the beach. Quite often there is a hole in the curve and a bank on the point. Particularly on a low spring tide, these banks are often easy to walk or wade onto and invariably the water on the other side of the bank is very deep. It is also a feature that is very consistent in terms of producing fish. Always check out the points on the beach and be there before the tide starts to push.

Very Important: Whenever you look down a beach, remember that what you see from the side is often very misleading. Do not make an assessment looking left or right on the beach. Try to get up high or else walk down the beach to the feature that you think you are seeing. Take some time to  watch and allow some sets to come through, especially if the sea is calm. This will help you to better understand what lies beneath. You will be amazed how often water that does not look good from the side, is in fact really good when you get to it!

Hope this helps someone!  w;k

Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: REEFMAN on November 09, 2011, 02:42:57 PM
Part 2 will deal with Rock fishing... when I've got some time...  :cnfzd


Edit:

Ok done... Part 2: http://www.ultimateangling.co.za/index.php/topic,7429.0.html (http://www.ultimateangling.co.za/index.php/topic,7429.0.html)
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: WalkersKiller on November 09, 2011, 02:50:56 PM
Wow excellent post Reefz, very helpful...  :resp: :resp: :resp: :resp: :resp: :+ cred:

One question I have always wanted to ask... I have caught fish in the trough or channels leading out to sea and I have caught fish on sandbanks... I presume the channel would be a better area to fish?
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: REEFMAN on November 09, 2011, 02:57:01 PM
The channel opening is good... this is where the scent calls fish in from outside the Sandbank. Particularly helpful when sliding or casting big baits. But if you're talking about the troughs... no this is the worst option - a barren area. It's only the occasional predator that comes swimming through the troughs. The edges of Sandbanks is the place to be for eds and the predators that follow them. For flatfish- on top of the sandbanks.
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: WalkersKiller on November 09, 2011, 03:02:07 PM
The channel opening is good... this is where the scent calls fish in from outside the Sandbank. Particularly helpful when sliding or casting big baits. But if you're talking about the troughs... no this is the worst option - a barren area. It's only the occasional predator that comes swimming through the troughs. The edges of Sandbanks is the place to be for eds and the predators that follow them. For flatfish- on top of the sandbanks.
That makes a lot of sense, have blanked quite a few times when fishing in troughs, wont be wasting my time there again...

Cool have caught Raggies and small Kob in channels and Blue Rays and Lesser Sandys on and just behind the sand banks...

I understand how to determine the depth of the water behind a sandbank after you explained it, dont know if i missed something but would the depth of the water behing a sandbank be the same depth as the channel adjacent to it?
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: PH on November 09, 2011, 03:04:02 PM
Great posting, Reefz!! :+ cred:
 
In Barry's booklet about kayak fishing, he illustrates rips currents but these illustrations makes it so much more clear that rip currents utilises or causes the channels prependicular to the beach. I never really understood or knew whether a rip current is parallel to the beach or perpendicular to the beach. (can be very dangerous for kayaking)
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: Rods on November 09, 2011, 03:15:18 PM
Absolutely brilliant post Reefs.  So much info. Yor!   :+ cred:
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: TUNAMAN on November 09, 2011, 03:16:16 PM
Post of the month by a mile. Where do I nominate?
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: TUNAMAN on November 09, 2011, 03:21:05 PM
Watched Off The Chart last night and Barry wanted to land a GT from the side on his last night there. He tested the waters till he come across a spot that he believed was 100% for GT. He stuck it out without pulls for hours and then a GT picked him up and he landed what was minimum a 40kg fish.

His knowledge on area selection was that good. I would have lost confidence by then.

Great post again Reefz!
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: WalkersKiller on November 09, 2011, 03:22:26 PM
Post of the month by a mile. Where do I nominate?
Already been nominated TM  :-)
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: Capt. Hook on November 09, 2011, 03:23:31 PM
Excellent Post
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: Half-Pint on November 09, 2011, 03:24:54 PM
Shooo Reefz going to have to come back to this after exams! Hours of reading and applying to what I have seen at the coast. Seriously top notch post and definitely something I need to work on. Being more of a south coast and transkei fishermen it tends to be arriving at a spot and putting a bait next to a rip and that's it. I need to develop my water reading skills for when I hit those north coast beaches
Title: Re: Reading the Water
Post by: WalkersKiller on November 09, 2011, 03:31:23 PM
Post of the month by a mile. Where do I nominate?
Already been nominated TM  :-)
Basted I was first  :unhap
:hnthnt:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Skaap Tjop on November 09, 2011, 04:54:09 PM
 :resp:    and lots of it...
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Homie on November 09, 2011, 04:57:36 PM
 (clap) (clap) (clap)

 :+ cred:

Great Work Tony
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Kumz on November 09, 2011, 04:58:20 PM
 (clap) ..... :win: ...... :udman: ........ :+ cred:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: AD97 on November 09, 2011, 05:13:02 PM
Wow Reefz. Article of the month!  :+ cred: :+ cred: :+ cred: :+ cred: :appr:  something to cheer me up after TaxEISHion exam today :cry:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Lichia amia on November 09, 2011, 05:32:10 PM
 (clap) (clap)    One of the best posts I have ever read . Well done Master !!! :+ cred:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Willie on November 09, 2011, 07:00:22 PM
Reefz this is an excelent informative post  :tkx:  this will help definitely help me. I was hoping that our TV fishing programs will show us this but you have outclassed them  :resp: :resp: :resp: :+ cred:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: krissi on November 09, 2011, 07:50:53 PM
WOW some serious time and effort put into this Reef - well done and much   :resp:     :+ cred:   I have only glanced through it but will be printing it to study it in detail to use at Nationals (for my own added advantage). Thank you very much!
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: krissi on November 09, 2011, 07:57:22 PM
Reefz this is an excelent informative post  :tkx:  this will help definitely help me. I was hoping that our TV fishing programs will show us this but you have outclassed them  :resp: :resp: :resp: :+ cred:

I couldn't agree more Willie  :FST:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: sardinella on November 09, 2011, 08:19:19 PM
Thank you SIR  (clap)


have some cred
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Habib on November 09, 2011, 09:00:12 PM
omg...top class tony. im sure every one who has read this will now go to the beach and look at the water and grin cos they know what to look for.

excellent ....post of the year. +c
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: strandloper on November 10, 2011, 07:32:05 AM
Excellent post Reefs!!
 
This is something that should be put into a "new to shore angling" section or something. Anyone new to R&S fishing must read this post.
 
 :+ cred:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Zetti on November 10, 2011, 07:42:33 AM
Huge  :tkx:  for this one Reefs. I'm still  :nuts:  when it comes to shore fishing but this will help no doubt.
 
 :resp:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Rory on November 10, 2011, 07:57:14 AM
Super super post! Thanks Reefs!  :+ cred:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: L Hooker on November 10, 2011, 07:58:26 AM
Brilliant post Reefs, :corrct: :corrct: :win: :shre:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: deezynking on November 10, 2011, 09:11:32 AM
 :win: :win: :win: :win: :win: :win: :win: :win: :win: :win: :win: :win:
BRILLIANT stuff Doc, i guess you gonna have o cancel a few more appointments to post the Rock fishing Tut.
again, thanks for making me understand the water.  :+ cred: :+ cred: :+ cred:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: JLP on November 10, 2011, 10:20:43 AM
 :shre: :win: :ayb AWESOME TOPIC!!!!! :beer:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Poenskop on November 10, 2011, 11:39:54 AM
Awesome post Tony. Just in time for the holidays. :win: :tkx: 
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: SAfish on November 10, 2011, 11:42:46 AM
Great post.  :tkx: :win:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Moolies on November 10, 2011, 12:29:20 PM
Hi Reefz,


Firstly  a huge compliment to you for the artical  :+ cred: to you.
Can't wait see part 2.


My question is are you also going to be covering the western cape as our winds are different to those of KZN?


Cheers,
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on November 10, 2011, 04:27:04 PM
Moolies... most of the basic principles discussed will cover our whole coastline - the KZN examples are just used to illustrate the point. I haven't fished the Cape waters much, so I cannot speak about the prevailing conditions there with any authority at all...  sry
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Moolies on November 10, 2011, 04:42:27 PM
Its a pity a lot of the experience Cape town fisherman hardly past their knowledge other than the likes of Oom Daisy for Langebaan.
( I might be speaking under correction i apologize before hand if i have offended any one CPT on the Forum)



I would really like to meet some of the guys if any on :ult:    and show me the ropes of Capetown.


 :shre:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Half-Pint on November 10, 2011, 04:47:37 PM
Many of the competitive guys are very tight lipped about their secrets but we are fortunate here to have some guys who are willing to share. Sylvester, Angler1, Lenny and Ray Hall all contribute and I'm sure they will help you out (apologies if I forgot any other CPT anglers!)
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: MIKE PIKE on November 10, 2011, 08:34:19 PM
Now thats a  :win:  post Tony... (clap) .. :shre: .
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Moolies on November 11, 2011, 07:25:27 AM
Thanks Halfpint,
Now to just meet up with them and make some contact that would be a real experience for me.  :FST:



Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Garrick on November 11, 2011, 10:49:19 AM
Now that is what I call an  :ayb  post.........Give that man a Bells.......................
Excellant post Tony.Could not have explained it more simpler.Your wealth of knowledge which you share is really appreciated. :shre: :udman: :+ cred: :+ cred: :+ cred: :+ cred: :+ cred:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Willie on November 11, 2011, 10:56:20 AM
Now O.K. when are we going fishing  :hehe:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: John F on November 11, 2011, 05:52:00 PM
What everybody said!

Sometimes most of all this stuff is somehow in the back of our heads... collating all the info and put it together in order to make sense... that takes a lot of work and insight!

Well done Reefz and thanks! :+ cred:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: adam on November 11, 2011, 07:10:38 PM
Cool stuff! :+ cred:


What do you guys think of this type of water?
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: LUPO on November 12, 2011, 08:23:56 AM
 :udman: Reefs

Just when one thinks you have posted all the info in your head, you come up with this brilliant post.

 (clap) (clap)

Now I am saving for a plane so I can get an arial view of the stretch of beach I am going to fish on. LOL
Maybe I should just ask Angler1 for a fly-by when he is in the air.

 :tkx: Reefs
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Manuel Junior on November 12, 2011, 08:42:11 AM
 :shre: :clwn :clwn stuff!! (clap) (clap) (clap)
 :appr:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: bryant on November 15, 2011, 01:08:08 PM
anybody have a nice picture of a hole?
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on November 15, 2011, 01:18:09 PM
 sry ... couldn't resist!  :hyst:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: bryant on November 15, 2011, 01:29:39 PM
Thats Fair (clap)
 
Almost expected something along those lines... at least casting distance wont be a issue
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on November 15, 2011, 01:36:02 PM
Ok here we go...

Sandbank at the back. Shallow trough either side, with white water running over it. Distinct 'Hole' with deeper water in it, with a channel leading out to sea.

2nd diagram is how the hole works... (Not my pic, can't remember where I got it from?)
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Shane on November 17, 2011, 11:15:35 AM
Fantastic post. Reefs... you are very kind to share your knowledge like this.
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on November 17, 2011, 11:35:42 AM
Fantastic post. Reefs... you are very kind to share your knowledge like this.

Nah bru, you'd do the same...

nice to see you here Porkers!
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: zulu-X-treme on November 21, 2011, 05:43:11 PM
Excellent, excellent, excellent... What a great post, highly informative and educational... Thank you!!!
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: MadGerman on January 05, 2012, 04:08:18 PM
 (clap) Brilliant Post Tony, Thanks for this  :udman:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: jaenswart on January 09, 2012, 06:37:09 PM
very informative, Thank you very much. I am always the first one to throw in those lekka deep troughs close in...now I know why I dont catch anything :-)
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: PH on January 11, 2012, 06:27:11 AM
Would this be a example of a rip current?
Please see centre of the short video taken from Robberg at Plett
The "tongue" of white foam is clearly moving out to sea?



RIP (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7AG_w2QVQA&feature=youtu.be#ws)
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on January 11, 2012, 08:03:34 AM
Yep PH. Dead right. If you look closely, you can see other rips along the Coastline, but not as strong as the middle one.


Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: PH on January 11, 2012, 08:23:28 AM
Thanks, Reefz.
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: SAfish on January 11, 2012, 08:53:33 AM
You can also faintly see the old shipwreck.

Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: PH on January 11, 2012, 08:55:50 AM
You can also faintly see the old shipwreck.
:corrct:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Weedeater on January 30, 2012, 04:58:03 PM
Super post Reefer!  :win: Would give you some cred, if I could figure out how?

Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on January 30, 2012, 05:23:07 PM
Shot Brendan... click the thumbs up or thumbs down pic....

http://www.ultimateangling.co.za/index.php?topic=1927.0 (http://www.ultimateangling.co.za/index.php?topic=1927.0)
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Weedeater on January 30, 2012, 05:35:13 PM
Shot Brendan... click the thumbs up or thumbs down pic....

http://www.ultimateangling.co.za/index.php?topic=1927.0 (http://www.ultimateangling.co.za/index.php?topic=1927.0)


Done!  :+ cred:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: TUNAMAN on January 31, 2012, 08:55:48 AM
Weedeater just to be sure you have it right, click on mine to. They say practice makes perfect.  w;k
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: Russell on February 09, 2012, 09:38:04 PM
Awesome post. Most appreciated since I am a Novice part-time fisherman.  :+ cred: :+ cred: :clfoto:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: marinello599 on February 25, 2012, 03:19:08 PM
Hiya Reefs,


Excellent compilation......good reading :udman:
Title: Re: Reading the Water - Part 1
Post by: mervyn on March 24, 2012, 05:55:30 PM
great thanks reef now i am a bit wiser

Title: Re: Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Ray786 on April 24, 2012, 01:59:38 PM
This helps me so much being a total no0b it gives me better understanding of the sea water.

One question though, for example the pic below where exactly would you cast your line into?

(http://www.africanaquatics.co.za/FISHING/Fishing%20stuff/read%20the%20sea/TROUGH.jpg)
Title: Re: Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on April 24, 2012, 02:31:04 PM
If you're targetting edibles, then cast as close to the sandbanks (on either side of the channel opening) as you can. Even onto them is fine, because the waves will slowly wash your bait down into the dropoff where the predators will be waiting in ambush.

If you're targetting bigger eds, ineds or sliding, then a big bait as far into the channel as you can.
NB - Stay away from the Deep trough. There is no structure or hiding places for baitfish in these troughs, therefore no predators. If you cast into the trough, you're just wasting your time, even though the water looks so deep and inviting!
Title: Re: Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Ray786 on April 24, 2012, 02:33:47 PM
If you're targetting edibles, then cast as close to the sandbanks (on either side of the channel opening) as you can.

If you're targetting bigger eds, ineds or sliding, then a big bait as far into the channel as you can.

Thanks so much, you have no idea how much of a help you have been  :win:
Title: Re: Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on April 24, 2012, 02:36:23 PM
Glad to be of assistance bud.
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: ProKayak on July 19, 2012, 05:04:46 PM
 (clap) (clap) (clap) (clap) (clap) (clap) (clap) (clap) (clap) (clap) (clap)






when is the  :ult: angling book by Reefman getting published?
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: baily on July 20, 2012, 01:18:35 PM
hi there reefman, gr8 post!
 
just a quick one, what is ur view on strong side currents, her in PE in some areas we battle!
even a 8oz to 10oz grap sinker at maitlands or bhb will get washed to the side..i hav tried bending the wire out more it helps but then the sinker gets buried under the sand…have tried thinner line also.. i have now given up on fishing some of my fav spots...in the attached pick of maitlands you can c some nice holes but try to get to them or the sides..? mission impossible at times…LOL any case
 
 
 
 
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on July 20, 2012, 01:24:28 PM
There's not much you can do if a 10oz sinker doesn't hold! My suggestion in these circumstances would be to move spots - find a Point and fish the leeward side.

Have you tried long boom sinkers? They definitely bite into the sand better in these conditions... 
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: baily on July 20, 2012, 01:34:38 PM
thanx for reply reefman, yes i have tried a buch of diff sinkers..we walked and walked and walked, but same thing! LOL
 
 
 
 
 
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: KFPanda on November 16, 2012, 12:05:32 PM
 (clap) (clap) (clap) (clap) (clap)
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Half-Pint on January 08, 2013, 10:46:53 AM
Perhaps someone can explain this to me. We are now in to day 3 of the NE wind here in margate. This should be prime non ed time however due to the recent rains the water is doing a serious chocolate milkshake impression. Now what I don't get is the effects of Eckmann transport this inshore brown water should move out to sea? Instead it is pushed in to a tight band up against the coast line. I know that cold water has moved in as we have seen a marked decline in water temp. So why on earth is the muddy water not moved out :dunno:
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on January 08, 2013, 11:15:13 AM
The North Easter needs to quieten down or change direction for the brown water to move offshore. The upwelling is bringing cold water in, but the persistent North Easter will keep the surface water the same.
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Half-Pint on January 08, 2013, 11:17:59 AM
So technically you should have a layer of cooler clear water underneath the brown?
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on January 08, 2013, 12:19:05 PM
Yes. Don't know how deep the cooler water would be though? :dunno:
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: ErnieH on January 11, 2013, 09:32:32 AM
Catching up on some reading....very good article, well written and helpful indeed.
Thanks a ton.
 
E
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Seventenths on January 11, 2013, 12:17:06 PM
 :+ cred:
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: adam on January 31, 2013, 09:21:13 AM
Hey Tony, have a bash at this one.  What do you think we will catch here?


Yesterday on the Tsitsikamma coast
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on January 31, 2013, 10:51:19 AM
Not all that familiar with Eastern Cape waters, but that pic tells me there's awesome colour in the water - Kob water?! A nice long flat bank at the back where the waves break and continue to run through to a deeper gully, where they stop. Some patches of rock in the water for some smaller edibles... Stumpies, Blacktail, Steenies? Nice churning water in the gully... ?
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: adam on January 31, 2013, 11:17:02 AM
spot on Reefs!


Kob, steenbras, blacktail and belman.  with the odd gully shark
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on January 31, 2013, 11:51:38 AM
 :happ: so where's my Noddy badge!?!
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: adam on January 31, 2013, 11:55:06 AM
:happ: so where's my Noddy badge!?!


 :appr:    that's the best I can do. 

Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Nakkie on January 31, 2013, 11:56:33 AM
One day when my memory works again, I should be able to remember to read the water first and then start to fish a spot... duh
 
Weldone Tony. It's scary how you can get all that info of 1 pic.  :udman:
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Charles on January 31, 2013, 12:04:31 PM
 :corrct: Nakkie. When I look at pic's I seem to be doing OK. (I had basically the same as Adam except I missed the Belman and added a Cracker depending on the season).
 
Sadly when I'm next to the water it all looks the same! :cnfzd
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: bennie on June 07, 2013, 09:01:35 AM
Very informative. Thanks   :+ cred:
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: wimter on February 24, 2014, 05:13:00 PM
Hey Reefz, one of the most simplistic and complete peace info on this topic.Thanks man  :resp: :+ cred: :+ cred: :+ cred:
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: colin on February 24, 2014, 06:06:09 PM
 duh :tkx:  most informative and clearly stated. Wish I read this 40 years ago.
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Kleynhansa on August 31, 2014, 12:32:37 AM
Thank you reefman. Very informative :+ cred:
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on September 01, 2014, 01:53:42 PM
No sweat. Glad you enjoyed it.
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Torpedo Jack on December 19, 2014, 11:14:06 AM
Hi all!

Great article! From the information given, I have tried to sum up the "deep bank scenario" in picture form. Please forgive the kindergarten artwork!


Okay, here's the key...


A=Deep water
B=Bank
C="Cob Alley" ????
D=Trough (unproductive)
E=Foamy water
F=Shoreline


My big question is: Will the Cob be holding on the section marked "C", i.e. the shoreward side of the bank?


Thanks for your help!

Mike

Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Half-Pint on December 19, 2014, 03:53:30 PM
I think it would depend on the current. They would wait where food will be washed to them by current (Lazy buggers!)
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Lofty on December 21, 2014, 03:21:01 PM
I would say between A & B as the swell will be forced upwards and will break because of the sandbank,forming foamy white water which causes cover for predators and baitfish alike,with the surging of the water,kob will patrole up and down this bank looking for baitfish to be washed off the bank...(that's if the back of the bank is in casting range...)Then also anywhere from C-F as Kob will come in very close to shore,mostly at night,to hunt on mullets in the shorebreak,as mullets will mostly hide in the shallows to stay away from predators like Kob,Elf and Leeries...0,5m of water is deep enough for these fish to hunt in as they will try trap the baitfish in the shallows...very often we as shorefishermen will cast over the feeding areas of predators,many decent fish have been caught when the cast was duffed or an overwind was casted... w;k especially when the "white water" covers the trough between B and F...especially Kob,as was mentioned,will mostly rely on ambushing prey where water conditions cause confusion amongst prey fish... :clwn
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Lenny on December 21, 2014, 04:55:43 PM
My take on the sketch if I understand it correct .


A/B on a incoming tide  , but in the same time , they would also hide in front of the bank .


A rule of thumb , is the kob will either sit on one side , but its rare to find them on both sides of a bank , on any given tide . They might be on one side on low , and on the other side of the same bank as ou fished on low .


If your fishing the sand for Kob , they are either feeding on worms , or Mullets , 95% of the time Mullet , where you find the mullet , you will often find Kob .  If you see a shoal in the surf and they are moving quick its not ideal , but if they are trying to take cover under the foam , they theres something there keeping them there . Kob that actively feed , will patrol these edges , its convenient to see the tell tale drop off , where the foam ends .
On bright sunny days , Kob would sit on the bank in the foam , for some cover on high tides , they would then push the mullet into the deeper water , generally you are in for a dam good days fishing then  ...


Most fish you often encounter in shallower water than one would think , we cast over the fish , its not always the case but happens a lot , its not true to think that the long cast gets the fish over the short cast .


The ideal situation is a gutter like in your picture that opens up to the back ,  basically two parallel banks one very shallow and the next one deeper , those deeper banks , find a place where they open up to the back [ deep ] then you cast a bait on the corners of the second bank where they open up . so the Kob would have an IDEAL place to just chill in th current , and wait for its food to come past , BAM ! vas
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: ANTON 1 on December 23, 2014, 03:44:14 PM
 :Like: Great article and valued information READING THE WATER. Cool!
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: ravkiss on January 02, 2015, 05:06:47 AM
A brilliant explanation of the shore. Does this include where to luer fish for bass as well as baits?

 :tkx:
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on January 02, 2015, 01:11:04 PM
You mean Sea Bass? Don't know Sea Bass at all, don't think we get Bass in SAfrican ocean waters... but I'm sure the principles will be the same...  :dunno:
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Torpedo Jack on January 02, 2015, 02:34:59 PM
Thanks for all your input, guys!


Does the author agree with the theories?


Reefs?



Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on January 02, 2015, 03:54:31 PM
I think everyone has some good points...

As far as Kob goes, look for the deep drop-offs, particularly where there is a bit of a   swirling action in the water. Look for banks that are showing some foamies coming across, which then stop abruptly, indicating a deep and sudden drop-off; Rather than foamies extending over a larger area, which indicates a slow and gradual drop off.

 At the back of the bank, where the churning is happening, Kob will feed here, but the water needs to be mild to moderate, with not much current or surge - bait fish will not be able to hold there in a strong current.

Fish more often will feed on the shoreward side of these banks, especially where the white water stops quickly. The depth of these drop-offs is important, giving the Kob more cover and the takes are   often quite dramatic. I mentioned above the holding or resting areas,   because on many occasions anglers successfully catch fish that are not   feeding aggressively and not eating the baits, particularly size wise,   that they normally would. Just like any animal, once they have fed, they   are not inclined to take big bait, but will often just suck up a   tit-bit. When Kob are not feeding in the churn on the back of a bank or   on the shoreward deep dropoff, they can sometimes be found chilling in a hole   and will be tempted with a much smaller well-presented bait.
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: ahmed on January 06, 2015, 11:47:32 PM
This is my first post on ultimate and I have to say that the coverage of this topic by REEFMAN is without a doubt the most informative I've seen...on any site...EVER!!!     


 :resp: &  :tkx:
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: kobkiller on January 18, 2015, 06:33:57 AM
God bless your heart.This post is brilliant....informative and factually and visually tops

Thank you

Will it help somebody. ...let's take a consensus. ...and that includes old salty seadogs like me
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: CamaroMan on February 17, 2015, 09:36:02 AM
gee this is an incredible post. Just a question - u say troughs are bad for fishing, but also mention casting between 2 banks is good. Im just trying to get clarity - been struggling to land good fish my whole life!

clear water nono..


Deep water with rip out to sea good? Otherwise deep water without motion is also not good?


Cast on top of or on the side of banks where water is moving and on sides of rips out to sea?


Dont some guys target troughs with roller sinkers?


I guess it would be a bit too much to ask to add green ticks on some picsc to show where the good spots are for us not so good fishers? :)


thanks for this info - i will def take it with me on next trip!

Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Lenny on February 17, 2015, 09:34:52 PM
Welcome camaroMAn .


I should Reefman give you more pointers , He will [ hes got an all seeing eye LOL ]


You make mention of cone sinkers or pyramids , I love fishing with them because you know they move around and will 'sit' when the sinker has rolled into a hole or gutter .


The tricky thing when trying to direct people to areas they should cast is the fact that the fish are not in one specific area  , keep in mind , they move with the tide , and thats where the trick comes in .


you might fish the whole  low tide in one area , just to move to another , and see someone else casting where you were fishing the whole time , ad vas he goes .


pointers I can ADD .
1. fish are after food , so the food dictates the movement of the fish most of the time , second comes Wind/weather .
2.in my experience I have found if theres one fish theres more .
3.sometimes we try to help , but in the process confuse guys a lot , its not that hard to read the water , only in Flat seas its very hard if you don't know the area .
4 . referring back to point 1 above , Fish will size up the energy it will take to eat a meal , and the energy value of the meal [ baitfish or bait ] Fish like Kob are lazy buggers , they will sit in the current on the edges of banks and wait for food to pass by or get washed from the shallow bank . Other fish like Leervis and Elf  just goes into a frenzy sometimes , and thats when the most of them get caught , don't know if its just the food that excited them or/and does water temp speed up their metabolism i think a bit of both ...
5 when in doubt , try some thing else you have notting to lose except a sinker or so , sometimes just a couple of meters to were your bait have been will be completely different .
6 fish the right conditions , I assume you are fishing Falsbay ? Now let me tell you if the weather /condisions are not conducive to fishing for Summer fish [ Elf Kob ] then don't waist your time . if those SW NW wind come in summer maybe the first day is still good .
7 . a long cast will not ensure you get a fish [ another mistake most guys make , I for one had this problem for many years , blamed my blanks on not casting far enough . ] I eventually stated getting fish on short casts , and in some seriously shallow water , lost of old salts will say ' your casting over the fish ' I never believed it but its true . 60 to 80 m will often out fish the guys casting 130 150 meters .
8 having bait in the water , and a never give up attitude will get you through those tough days and blanks NEVER GIVE UP !
 
Theres a bit of info to confuse you even more .... LOL
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Spud on October 13, 2015, 06:58:35 PM
 :shmno: no 1 arrived in the Bluff , wind howling  strong south easily what to do !!!!!
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on October 14, 2015, 11:46:06 AM
:shmno: no 1 arrived in the Bluff , wind howling  strong south easily what to do !!!!!

Catch a movie?
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Jakes on October 14, 2015, 12:28:49 PM
:shmno: no 1 arrived in the Bluff , wind howling  strong south easily what to do !!!!!

Catch a movie?

Or go to the closest pub and wait/ :beer: it out ...  w;k
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: Lenny on October 14, 2015, 05:14:34 PM
 I would suggest , a meal before heading to the pub , a flaming hot bunny!
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: oryx on March 02, 2020, 02:38:29 PM
Hi Reefman,I am new to the forum.  Thank you very much for this article!!  I have been searching for exactly this info and I think it's going to be a great help in my fairly new rock and surf endeavours.
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: REEFMAN on March 03, 2020, 08:23:31 AM
 :welc: Oryx! Glad it helped you!
Title: Re: How to Read the Sea - Read the Water - Part 1
Post by: RiyadhEd on March 03, 2020, 10:01:57 AM
Hi Reefman,I am new to the forum.  Thank you very much for this article!!  I have been searching for exactly this info and I think it's going to be a great help in my fairly new rock and surf endeavours.




Indeed, It has helped me in january when I last fished. I actually found a gully and caught some.
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