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Offline ades

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Quick Easter Weekend Report
« on: April 12, 2018, 07:53:25 am »
After moving to PE in January, work has been extremely busy and I finally found the time to wet a line with the family coming over from Durban for a holiday.


Friday saw us in Jeffreys bay for the 1st time, what an incredible beach. Gives you an opportunity to take some great photo's (which is what happens when you blank). Not knowing the area at all, apart from endless research and google images, we found a dead end parking by some restaurant. My brother and I walked a little north to a few sets of rocks and threw prawn baits in the gullies. A few pinkies came out until the tide pushed us off the rocks. Then we walked back towards the car and fished just to the left of the 1st set of rocks, got a few bites. My lightie got a silver bream (not sure what it's called in these parts) and I got a karenteen which made me extremely excited...1st fish after 3 months haha. After that, headed back to PE.




On Saturday, we did not get a chance to do some proper fishing with the entire family around. So we resorted to light tackle along the rocks next to the 6 pillars. Got plenty of fish (not sure what they are), all on the high tide. There was group of youngsters that had a blast releasing the fish for us. Arguing among themselves whose turn is next. What is the best way to release them? Throw them as far as you can or gently lower them into the water and let them swim away? Apart from their brilliant releasing, they made some exciting conversation :lolo:


On Sunday, we planned to go to Blue Water Bay, stopped at Trophy Tackle Den and met a guy there that said there are some good kob and steenbraas coming out at Swartkops. My brother chatted to him, got a few directions from google maps on his phone and off we went. I was eager as a steenbraas is my goal since I am here in PE. Sadly enough, only managed a few bream with the lightie hooking and landing 4 all by himself. The best i got for the day was a cut on my thumb from being away from a fishing for 3 months...almost lost my nail <: . had a small braai, spent some quality family times which beats anything and everything.


Adrian
« Last Edit: April 12, 2018, 07:57:02 am by ades »

Offline ades

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2018, 07:54:34 am »
The fish from the pillars, ID anyone?

Offline WalkersKiller

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2018, 09:53:50 am »
Thanks for the report  Adrian (clap)  :+ cred:

Think the fish is a juvenile Santer.

Offline ades

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2018, 10:09:56 am »
Thanks WK, me thinks so too.


On light tackle, they pull incredibly hard. Was a bit of a disappointment to see such a small fish when you pull them out. Better than blanking though.

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2018, 10:15:00 am »
Always better than blanking. I will take anything, especially because I havent fished the salt for 18 months, will catch 5cm Karanteen all day if I have to  :hehe:

Whats weird is that I have seen a lot of Santer come out off the bricks in that area, and they normally are associated with deep reefs offshore.

Offline ades

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2018, 10:18:44 am »
18 months :cnfzd  here I thought my 3 months away from the salt was bad.


Those fish where in numbers, cast out. Not even 30 seconds tap tap and you pulled flat. I stopped counting at 20. Caught way more after that in a short period of time. The only reason why we stopped fishing was due to the tide dropping, and i had came straight from work. No way i was getting wet in jeans and steel tipped safety boots  :hehe:

Offline Visenvryheid

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2018, 10:46:28 am »
Nice report, looks like you had fun anyway, the kids look like they had a blast! Looks like santer agreed, the first pic is it not maybe sand steenbras or baby steenbras, second pic looks like little cape stumpnose?

The offshore reefs that hold santer are upcurrent of that area, the east current should spit their larvae out from there all the way to the struisbaai..;) Then again the east current will spit out fish all along that route and an upwelling will force them into deep holes against the side, so a strong east current and then 2 days at that spot of west and you should catch karel grootoogs and all the baby deeper reef fish and I've caught a 2kg tomato rockcod near blombos past stilbaai (range is supposed to end at durbs) and they have caught dorado in knysna lagoon under the same conditions..the big fish will be gone and off the bite under those conditions but the sharks will be in full force and you see the whole crowd out taking advantage of the sharks who are taking advantage of the stunned fish. In the old days there would probably be a run of big poensies, miss lucies and big red steenies under those conditions, in hermanus in the old days when the same occured due to their prevailing wind/current they would call that the "red tide" rather than the plankton bloom, the sea turning red from the vast shoals of massive red steenbras coming past, see Biden's book "Sea Angling Fishes of the Cape" for accounts of those days that will shock you as to how bad we have it and how good it was. A copy of that book should be given out with fishing licences to show us what it should be like and give us incentive to get our s#it in order, pity those stocks are long gone..but good sign for the santer offshore spawning stocks that lots of babies are inshore.

« Last Edit: April 16, 2018, 10:07:36 am by Visenvryheid »

Offline WalkersKiller

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2018, 10:55:19 am »
18 months :cnfzd  here I thought my 3 months away from the salt was bad.


Those fish where in numbers, cast out. Not even 30 seconds tap tap and you pulled flat. I stopped counting at 20. Caught way more after that in a short period of time. The only reason why we stopped fishing was due to the tide dropping, and i had came straight from work. No way i was getting wet in jeans and steel tipped safety boots  :hehe:
:hehe: 18 months is no joke lol.

At least you had lots of action!

Offline WalkersKiller

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2018, 10:55:48 am »

The offshore reefs that hold santer are upcurrent of that area, the east current should spit their larvae out from there all the way to the struisbaai..;) Then again the east current will spit out fish all along that route and an upwelling will force them into deep holes against the side, so a strong east current and then 2 days at that spot of west and you should catch karel grootoogs and all the baby deeper reef fish and I've caught a 2kg tomato rockcod near blombos past stilbaai (range is supposed to end at durbs) and they have caught dorado in knysna lagoon under the same conditions..the big fish will be gone and off the bite under those conditions but the sharks will be in full force and you see the whole crowd out taking advantage of the sharks who are taking advantage of the stunned fish. In the old days there would probably be a run of big poensies, miss lucies and big red steenies under those conditions, in hermanus in the old days when the same occured due to their prevailing wind/current they would call that the "red tide" rather than the plankton bloom, see Biden's book for accounts of those days that will shock you as to how bad we have it and how good it was. Pity those stocks are long gone..good sign for the santer offshore spawning stocks that lots of baby santer are inshore.

Very interesting, thanks for sharing!

Offline ades

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2018, 11:36:23 am »
Nice report, looks like you had fun anyway, the kids look like they had a blast! Looks like santer agreed, the first pic is it not maybe sand steenbras or baby steenbras, second pic looks like little cape stumpnose?

The offshore reefs that hold santer are upcurrent of that area, the east current should spit their larvae out from there all the way to the struisbaai..;) Then again the east current will spit out fish all along that route and an upwelling will force them into deep holes against the side, so a strong east current and then 2 days at that spot of west and you should catch karel grootoogs and all the baby deeper reef fish and I've caught a 2kg tomato rockcod near blombos past stilbaai (range is supposed to end at durbs) and they have caught dorado in knysna lagoon under the same conditions..the big fish will be gone and off the bite under those conditions but the sharks will be in full force and you see the whole crowd out taking advantage of the sharks who are taking advantage of the stunned fish. In the old days there would probably be a run of big poensies, miss lucies and big red steenies under those conditions, in hermanus in the old days when the same occured due to their prevailing wind/current they would call that the "red tide" rather than the plankton bloom, see Biden's book for accounts of those days that will shock you as to how bad we have it and how good it was. Pity those stocks are long gone..good sign for the santer offshore spawning stocks that lots of baby santer are inshore.


Agreed, that is an excellent lot of info. The normal KZN tactics won't work that well down here so it's going to take weeks, if not months of trail and error to find the right patterns and conditions!. Thanks!

Offline Visenvryheid

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2018, 10:37:19 am »
Ja fishing in E cape very dynamic..but once you figure things out..eish..too much fish and not enough time..lucky for the bass who get harrassed far less than in the rest of the country..

With regards to stocks coming back..lots of young basterman offshore as well and bek slowly coming back too. Steenies and shad slowly coming back as well. Cob too but still hammered in E cape and s cape, false bays' stock doing well, hopefully going to restock the rest of the coast once those plentiful 8-10kg resident fish go north to look for sardines and spawn. Leeries hammered completely after 3 years sardine runs and spawning stock been turned into curry and hit by poachers commercially to be filleted and I suspect be sent up north inland or exported(seems to be well organised from what I hear and some are travelling south to target them in the kei with mackies, eish).

On the up side, the leeries had very good recruitment of spawning stock for 7-3years ago so the mass that went north had at least one very good spawn event in the recent past and 1-4kg rats are full up inshore and in estuaries in E and southern cape..Lots and lots of tiny leervis caught and carefully released when throwing net for mullet in southern rivers. Numbers of large fish down to less than 10% of what was around 4 years ago is my guess from spending lots of time at the water..I hope and pray for limit to be reduced for them to one fish and I hope and pray for a slot limit to be imposed before these fish reach adulthood. Seeing as they grow so fast, 3 years to maturity I think but not sure..

But looks good with the inshore cracker stock, for the last five years I've seen   more and more of the cute orange tailed babies in the rockpools, with   the blacktail in summer, good sign for their stocks coming back and   incentive for me to keep on releasing the big fish I catch (!Love catching em!) and sign that   more and more people are also releasing the large breeders to carry on   spawning..I found a pool yesterday with more little cracker in it than   blacktails and that made me very happy. If we were to continue with the   current fishing pressure but release all large adults and undersize, by   the time our kids grow up we could have things back like they were   during bidens time.

Conservation measures in the bay between Auz and indonesia and catch limits etc..where the the entire stock of Southern Bluefin tuna breed are slowly allowing the species to edge back, although still endangered and there is much critism of current fishing, anecdotally the stock is on the way back and in auz numbers of juveniles and mid range fish are on the up and up, and we are seeing them here offshore again as the super large adults for the first time in decades..I have been lucky enough to have been on a boat that "possibly" hooked up on one, 4 1/2 hours later on a tiagra 130 and 130lb class gear and we will never know what it was but there is only one thing it could have been based on the fight and the light "shad bait" piece of sardine it ate on the surface and the house sized explosion of white water when it boiled on a popper..anyway..those are my wet dreams..

I dream of being alive and with my body still able, when the days of the fishing of those days of Biden are back..I drool and read about the eldorado of fishing, Hermanus?!, and cape point and mosselbay and wish that we fish for the future... Katonkel used to be taken in great numbers from the side and sea in mossel bay in the day during elninos, not sarda sarda, but couta katonkel, King Mackerel..The main fish taken from the side in hermanus in the old days were cob, geelbek, geelstert, yellowfin tuna, vast numbers of large mackerels up to 2kg and sarda sardas, cracker was also quite common. The rest that we catch there today was by catch then and stuff they left for the treknets like steenies, belman and galjoen..the same guy that had the world record for biggest fish (GW) from the side (in hermanus) has fishing records of him and 10-15 anglers taking over 1500 (YES THATS 1500! No Error) large cob and geelbek from the rocks during one night with a few hundred blue shad between them. The fishing would have probably started the previous afternoon to catch mackeral as bait, but the guy (selkirk? might be his name?) himself caught over 100 large shad (10lb+ giants by todays standards like you see in american bluefish videos) and over 100 large geelbek and a few large cob from the rocks during just one night in the 50's. It was not uncommon. The first guys that fished cape point would have challenges we only dream about, where the hundreds of bek that would be hooked, everytime a mackerel on a hook was thrown over the rocks, the challenge was to get him out before one of the hundred resident giant red steenbrasses like hungry dogs would rob you,hook line and sinker like seals do today..The stories of resident huge miss lucies at certain fishing spots that were too smart to take a bait, any bait, and the fishermen and tourists would watch it hunt octopi on the val, going up and down with the surge..that one had a name and was like a pet at kalk bay if I remember the story right..

One day..hope it does not take too long..my body already getting cranky :)
« Last Edit: August 02, 2018, 11:12:16 am by Visenvryheid »

Offline Visenvryheid

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Re: Quick Easter Weekend Report
« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2018, 11:03:47 am »
More on the garrick stocks...here is an ORI study from late 2000's..from flytalk..there they reckon the stock is 14% of unfished levels and considered collapsed already..Now I know ballies who watched the shoals in the old days that stretched for kilometers when returning from the sardine run (one years shoal was estimated at being over 15km long no jokes, imagine what the fishing was like then)..the stock today is FAR LESS than 14% of that..after late 2000's there was no proper winter upwell for a few years and the sardine stocks were down too so no big runs happened for a few years, which I'm not sure..I caught the tail end of the last 3 years of that where the leeries became phenomenal in the southern cape again..then 3 good years of winter upwell and less and less leeries each year from then, last two dismal..honestly catching less in a season than I'd catch in a session years prior. In the late 2000's the scientists were already asking for reductions in limit to one fish, as well as a slot limit between 80cm and 100cm, closed seasons and MPA's in some estuarine areas. Ten years later nothing by government has been done. The stock started to claw its way back, but has since been hammered, the estuaries are not in great shape and gillnetting has soared since then. But luckily the sea and rivers are full of little rats as of now and it is up to us to ensure they can repopulate the stock so the fun can continue for all.. It is up to us to educate our fellow anglers as to the importance of leaving breeding stock to breed, returning large fish and not targeting with rod or spear endangered no-sale species for commercial profit when you are lucky to have the entire countries breeding stock come and visit. it is greedy and short-sighted.

"How is our garrick/leervis stock doing? Results of a recent stock assessment conducted by ORI. (LATE 2000's)
 
  By Bruce Mann and Daniel Smith
 
  The limited distribution range of garrick or leervis (Lichia amia), its   popularity as a gamefish to all sectors of the recreational fishery and   the degradation of many estuaries which function as important nursery   areas for this species, has aroused concern by anglers, fishery managers   and scientists about the stock status of this species. Other than a   preliminary investigation conducted by ORI in 1992 into the age, growth   and stock status of L. amia (van der Elst et al., 1993), surprisingly   little research has been undertaken on this important angling species.   Considering the value of garrick and the need to provide a scientific   basis for its future management, a comprehensive stock assessment was   recently undertaken by Daniel Smith, a MSc student from the University   of KwaZulu-Natal under the supervision of Bruce Mann and Rudy van der   Elst from ORI. The focus of this study was to investigate the age,   growth, movement and stock status of garrick in South African waters.
 
  Some of the key findings of this research project were as follows:
 
  •   Based on ageing of otoliths and analysis of growth rate determined   from tag-recapture data, garrick was found to be a relatively fast   growing species reaching a maximum age of 10+ years.
  •   Based on tag-recapture data, movement behaviour of garrick consists   of a resident, estuarine dependent juvenile phase and a highly migratory   adult phase with adults migrating to KZN to spawn during the winter   months and returning to cooler Cape waters in early summer.
  •   Trends in catch rates of garrick were determined from the analysis   of data stored on the National Marine Linefish System (NMLS) and the   Boat Launch Site Monitoring System databases. This analysis showed a   decreasing trend in catch per unit effort (CPUE) of garrick along the   KZN coast over time for all sectors of the KZN marine recreational   linefishery (i.e. shore fishing, recreational skiboat fishing and   spearfishing).
  •   Growth parameter estimates and catch data were used in undertaking a   per-recruit assessment of the garrick stock in South African waters.   The spawner-biomass-per-recruit (SBPR) model indicated that the garrick   stock is currently at approximately 14% of its unfished level!
 
  These results came as a shock to scientists who had previously   determined that the garrick stock was in relatively good shape due to is   fast growth rate. In terms of the Linefish Management Protocol, this   means that the garrick stock has collapsed (i.e. there may now be too   few adult fish left to ensure successful spawning and recruitment of   juveniles to sustain the population). Appropriate management action is   therefore urgently needed to help rebuild the stock. There are a number   of management options available which could be used to achieve this.   These include one or more of the following: reduce the daily bag limit   to one fish/angler/day; increase the minimum size limit to 90 cm TL;   introduce a slot size limit with a minimum size of 80 cm TL and a   maximum size limit of 100 cm TL; introduce a closed season from 1   October to 30 November; establish estuarine protected areas where   juveniles of this species are fully protected.
 
  The decision, on which of the above management options should be   implemented, needs to be taken by the responsible government scientific   and management working groups at Marine & Coastal Management (MCM).   These decisions should then be passed through a forum fully   representative of all user groups such as the South African Marine   Linefish Management Association (SAMLMA) to ensure user endorsement   before legislation is implemented.
  References cited:
  VAN DER ELST, R.P., GOVENDER, A. and S.A. CHATER 1993 - The biology and   status of the garrick (Lichia amia). In Fish, Fishers and Fisheries.   Proceedings of the Second South African Marine Linefish Symposium.   Beckley, L.E. and van der Elst R.P. (Eds.).              "

http://www.flytalk.co.za/forum/showthread.php/7288-Garrick-Recent-stock-assessment
« Last Edit: April 20, 2018, 11:10:01 am by Visenvryheid »