Author
Topic: catch and release  (Read 524 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline selfish

  • Member
  • *
  • Join Date: Jun 2011
  • Posts: 8
  • Cred: 0
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: Randburg Gauteng
catch and release
« on: March 27, 2019, 09:32:39 am »
Hi Guys,
My first post after trolling the forum for years :blush:


I see and hear a lot of conservation minded anglers on this forum and at clubs etc, everybody uses the right catch phrases like growing fish stocks, catch and release etc.
It has been my personal experience that , sadly, I have yet to see the catch and release ethic. Iam talking mostly gamefish here. Iam lucky enough to fish out of richards bay every second weekend, and so get to fish alongside many other boats at high points etc. We mostly jig and in fact release 90% of what we catch. Iam asked continously why we released fish???
Anybody else have similar experiences?

Offline FishStyx

  • Ultimate Champ
  • ****
  • Join Date: Nov 2011
  • Posts: 2812
  • Cred: 50
  • Gender: Male
  • I fish, therefore I am.
  • Location: Louist Trichardt, Limpopo
Re: catch and release
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2019, 11:07:51 am »
 :welc:  Welcome bud. Look fwd to your contributions.


I'm not entirely sure what you're getting at here... Are you asking whether we are also asked why we release fish? If that's what you're asking then yes and no.


Most of my salt water angling is done with like minded folk so there's never a question about releasing. On the other hand, I get roasted by the locals at my dams when I release fish... They cannot believe that I'd be so stupid to catch a fish and then chuck it back  :rotfl
Forgive me Father for I have spinned... It's been three weeks since my last cob session.

Offline selfish

  • Member
  • *
  • Join Date: Jun 2011
  • Posts: 8
  • Cred: 0
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: Randburg Gauteng
Re: catch and release
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2019, 11:18:01 am »
Thanks for the feedback,
Yip thats exactly what iam asking, not from my crew but other boats fishing same area, or at the club.
Seems people are not actually releasing any fish.

Offline Half-Pint

  • CHAMPION ANGLER 2014
  • Ultimate Hero
  • *****
  • Join Date: Jul 2010
  • Posts: 3824
  • Cred: 221
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: Boksburg
Re: catch and release
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2019, 12:34:20 pm »
For some reason this seems particularly prevalent among the ski boat fraternity  :dunno: It seems that billfish get released whilst everything else is kept


I suppose if you and the family consume what you catch (this excludes those who dump it in the freezer until its so burnt they end up throwing it away!) its no more harmful than buying your chicken from PNP? The recrommercials on the other hand (bat 

Offline Visenvryheid

  • Ultimate member
  • ***
  • Join Date: Jan 2015
  • Posts: 386
  • Cred: 23
  • Gender: Male
  • Location: Cape Town
Re: catch and release
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2019, 09:19:00 pm »
I used to get asked all the time why and what I am doing when releasing..half the time it would be curiousity or ignorance or both..half the time the guy was hungry..I'd take the time to explain, if it was a breeder why, if it was a slow grower why and sometimes if the guy was hungry and it was a little pecker I'd give him the fish and explain that he was lucky as if it was a big one it would have gone back swimming and when he would inevitably ask why, I'd reply that it would take thousands of larger fish than the tiddler to make the same amount of babies as one large fish..and so on..

But these days I am having to explain myself less and less and last season scratching for galjoen I was fishing with some "local" poorer folk and one caught a mase' cracker and promptly put it back! I asked him what he was doing and he explained to me that it was breeding stock! We chatted and discussed the breeding stock and how fish get more productive the older they get and so on and later he caught a smaller one later of abouts 8-10kg that he reckoned was his reward and took it home very chuffed. I got a gallie just shy of 60cm that went back and also one of abouts 38cm that came home..all in all I was very chuffed..More so that I see a change after years of drumming the greenie tune that the word is getting out that stocks are in bad shape and we need to carefully harvest our food and create a culture together of responsible fishing and looking after our fun and food together and improving things through being smart while still having fun and eating a fry..To see it repeated now in mag after mag and to see poor locals that can do with a big fish, returning them to breed, makes me feel warm and fuzzy inside!

Offshore though look billfish populations are down worldwide and longlining hammers them and what are you going to do with 300kg or more of marlin meat so I can understand the releasing. There is also the influence of the international billfishing scene as it is the sport of the jetsetters! Catch and release is the norm in a lot of places in the first world. That said the pelagics offshore are the most sustainable fish to keep, reef fish are the most unsustainable. A dorado grows to a meter in under a year but a poenskop takes 70 years. A yellowfin is 100kg+ and being caught in cape town at 3-5 years old!! A 50cm+ gallie is 20-30 years old...most fish encountered offshore are the right ones to be keeping for the pan and freezer. Inshore one must be very selective generally.

And then you get the spearos! LOL.. some are very eco minded and do things sustainable but while everyone is doing their part, our local ones are waiting for an upwell for the endangered reef fish to move out the reserves and onto the pinnacles above the thermocline, stunned so they can pot them and fill the secret hatches..each trip maybe a few centuries of fish growth..and less and less of the endangered breeders left to overflow onto the empty reefs up the coast for you guys to enjoy..eish..The pictures I have seen of literal lawns full of red steenbras, miss lucy and poensies...Others got so shocked by what goes on they stopped diving at all, some just go for pelagics, some rape it cause they can and they have rent to pay and willing buyers..

And then maybe one day everyone is doing their bit, and maybe even they stop or limit the shallow longlining and trawling, and no treknetters to F#$% it up as well...we better hope we have some estuaries left, undeveloped and industrialized and unpolluted.. :dunno: